Effectiveness

Recent studies may surprise you. Chiropractic effectiveness has gone beyond low back pain management.

Spinal manipulation should be pursued in most cases before considering surgery.

Agency for Health Care and Policy, 1994

…spinal manipulation is appropriate for specific types of low back pain.

RAND Corporation, 1992

There is no clinical or case-control study that demonstrates or even implies that chiropractic spinal manipulation is unsafe in the treatment of low-back pain. Some medical treatments are equally safe, but others are unsafe and generate iatrogenic complications for the LBP patients…The literature suggests that chiropractic manipulation is safer than medical management of low-back pain…There is an overwhelming body of evidence indicating that chiropractic management of low-back pain is more cost-effective than medical management…The evidence includes studies showing lower chiropractic costs for the same diagnosis and episodic need for care.

The MANGA Report, 1993

A group of chronic low-back patients who underwent chiropractic treatment showed higher pain relief and satisfaction with the care and lower disability scores than a group that underwent medical care.

Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, October 2005

One of America’s largest HMO’s, AVMED, sent 100 cases to a local Chiropractor to evaluate his results. Eighty of these cases were “medical failures.” Twelve of them were diagnosed by a medical team as needing disc surgery. The overall results were 86% within three weeks and not one of the 12 disc cases needed surgery after receiving Chiropractic care. The Medical director of AVMED concluded that the Chiropractor saved the HMO hundreds of thousand of dollars and untold suffering, as well as the hazards of major surgery.

AVMED Health Maintenance Organization, Miami, Florida 1982

This randomized controlled trial compared six weeks of spinal manipulative treatment of tension-type headache by Chiropractors to six weeks of treatment with amitriptyline, a medication often prescribed for treatment of severe tension headache pain. Researchers found that chiropractic patients experienced fewer side-effects (4.3%) than the amitriptyline group (82.1%) and while both were effective during the treatment phase of the study, only the Chiropractic patients continued to report fewer headaches when treatment ended.

The Boline Study, Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics. March/April 1995